Format number to always show 2 decimal places

I would like to format my numbers to always display 2 decimal places, rounding where applicable.

Examples:

number     display
------     -------
1          1.00
1.341      1.34
1.345      1.35

I have been using this:

parseFloat(num).toFixed(2);

But it's displaying 1 as 1, rather than 1.00.

Answers:

Answer
(Math.round(num * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);

Live Demo

var num1 = "1";
document.getElementById('num1').innerHTML = (Math.round(num1 * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);

var num2 = "1.341";
document.getElementById('num2').innerHTML = (Math.round(num2 * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);

var num3 = "1.345";
document.getElementById('num3').innerHTML = (Math.round(num3 * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);
span {
    border: 1px solid #000;
    margin: 5px;
    padding: 5px;
}
<span id="num1"></span>
<span id="num2"></span>
<span id="num3"></span>

Note that it will round to 2 decimal places, so the input 1.346 will return 1.35.

Answer
Number(1).toFixed(2);         // 1.00
Number(1.341).toFixed(2);     // 1.34
Number(1.345).toFixed(2);     // 1.34 NOTE: See andy's comment below.
Number(1.3450001).toFixed(2); // 1.35

document.getElementById('line1').innerHTML = Number(1).toFixed(2);
document.getElementById('line2').innerHTML = Number(1.341).toFixed(2);
document.getElementById('line3').innerHTML = Number(1.345).toFixed(2);
document.getElementById('line4').innerHTML = Number(1.3450001).toFixed(2);
<span id="line1"></span>
<br/>
<span id="line2"></span>
<br/>
<span id="line3"></span>
<br/>
<span id="line4"></span>

Answer
var num = new Number(14.12);
console.log(num.toPrecision(2));//outputs 14
console.log(num.toPrecision(3));//outputs 14.1
console.log(num.toPrecision(4));//outputs 14.12
console.log(num.toPrecision(5));//outputs 14.120
Answer

A much more generic solution for rounding to N places

function roundN(num,n){
  return parseFloat(Math.round(num * Math.pow(10, n)) /Math.pow(10,n)).toFixed(n);
}


console.log(roundN(1,2))
console.log(roundN(1.34,2))
console.log(roundN(1.35,2))
console.log(roundN(1.344,2))
console.log(roundN(1.345,2))
console.log(roundN(1.344,3))
console.log(roundN(1.345,3))
console.log(roundN(1.3444,3))
console.log(roundN(1.3455,3))

Output

1.00
1.34
1.35
1.34
1.35
1.344
1.345
1.344
1.346
Answer

Simplest answer:

var num = 1.2353453;
num.toFixed(2); // 1.24

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/E2XU7/

Answer

For the most accurate rounding, create this function:

function round(value, decimals) {
    return Number(Math.round(value +'e'+ decimals) +'e-'+ decimals).toFixed(decimals);
}

and use it to round to 2 decimal places:

console.log("seeked to " + round(1.005, 2));
> 1.01

Thanks to Razu, this article, and MDN's Math.round reference.

Answer
var number = 123456.789;


console.log(new Intl.NumberFormat('en-IN', { maximumFractionDigits: 2 }).format(number));

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/NumberFormat

Answer

If you're already using jQuery, you could look at using the jQuery Number Format plugin.

The plugin can return formatted numbers as a string, you can set decimal, and thousands separators, and you can choose the number of decimals to show.

$.number( 123, 2 ); // Returns '123.00'

You can also get jQuery Number Format from GitHub.

Answer

Is this what you mean?

function showAsFloat(num, n){
      return !isNaN(+num) ? (+num).toFixed(n || 2) : num;
}

document.querySelector('#result').textContent = 
    [
     'command                      | result',
     '-----------------------------------------------',
     'showAsFloat(1);              | ' + showAsFloat(1),
     'showAsFloat(1.314);          | ' + showAsFloat(1.314),
     'showAsFloat(\'notanumber\')    | ' + showAsFloat('notanumber'),
     'showAsFloat(\'23.44567\', 3)   | ' + showAsFloat('23.44567', 3),
     'showAsFloat(2456198, 5)      | ' + showAsFloat('2456198', 5),
     'showAsFloat(0);              | ' + showAsFloat(0)
    ].join('\n');
<pre id="result"></pre>

Answer

Convert a number into a string, keeping only two decimals:

var num = 5.56789;
var n = num.toFixed(2);

The result of n will be:

5.57
Answer

Are you looking for floor?

var num = 1.42482;
var num2 = 1;
var fnum = Math.floor(num).toFixed(2);
var fnum2 = Math.floor(num2).toFixed(2);
alert(fnum + " and " + fnum2); //both values will be 1.00
Answer

For modern browsers, use toLocaleString:

var num = 1.345;
num.toLocaleString(undefined, { maximumFractionDigits: 2, minimumFractionDigits: 2 });

Specify a locale tag as first parameter to control the decimal separator. For a dot, use for example English U.S. locale:

num.toLocaleString("en-US", { maximumFractionDigits: 2, minimumFractionDigits: 2 });

which gives:

1.35

Most countries in Europe use a comma as decimal separator, so if you for example use Swedish/Sweden locale:

num.toLocaleString("sv-SE", { maximumFractionDigits: 2, minimumFractionDigits: 2 });

it will give:

1,35

Answer

Here's also a generic function that can format to any number of decimal places:

function numberFormat(val, decimalPlaces) {

    var multiplier = Math.pow(10, decimalPlaces);
    return (Math.round(val * multiplier) / multiplier).toFixed(decimalPlaces);
}
Answer

Where specific formatting is required, you should write your own routine or use a library function that does what you need. The basic ECMAScript functionality is usually insufficient for displaying formatted numbers.

A thorough explanation of rounding and formatting is here: http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-round.htm#RiJ

As a general rule, rounding and formatting should only be peformed as a last step before output. Doing so earlier may introduce unexpectedly large errors and destroy the formatting.

Answer

You are not giving us the whole picture.

javascript:alert(parseFloat(1).toFixed(2)) shows 1.00 in my browsers when I paste it int0 the location bar. However if you do something to it afterwards, it will revert.

var num = 2
document.getElementById('spanId').innerHTML=(parseFloat(num).toFixed(2)-1)


shows 1 and not 1.00
Answer
var quantity = 12;

var import1 = 12.55;

var total = quantity * import1;

var answer = parseFloat(total).toFixed(2);

document.write(answer);
Answer

I had to decide between the parseFloat() and Number() conversions before I could make toFixed() call. Here's an example of a number formatting post-capturing user input.

HTML:

<input type="number" class="dec-number" min="0" step="0.01" />

Event handler:

$('.dec-number').on('change', function () {
     const value = $(this).val();
     $(this).val(value.toFixed(2));
});

The above code will result in TypeError exception. Note that although the html input type is "number", the user input is actually a "string" data type. However, toFixed() function may only be invoked on an object that is a Number.

My final code would look as follows:

$('.dec-number').on('change', function () {
     const value = Number($(this).val());
     $(this).val(value.toFixed(2));
});

The reason I favor to cast with Number() vs. parseFloat() is because I don't have to perform an extra validation neither for an empty input string, nor NaN value. The Number() function would automatically handle an empty string and covert it to zero.

Answer

I do like:

var num = 12.749;
parseFloat((Math.round(num * 100) / 100).toFixed(2)); // 123.75

Round the number with 2 decimal points, then make sure to parse it with parseFloat() to return Number, not String unless you don't care if it is String or Number.

Answer

Extend Math object with precision method

Object.defineProperty(Math, 'precision',{
   value: function (value,precision,type){
             var v = parseFloat(value),
                 p = Math.max(precision,0)||0,
                 t = type||'round';
              return (Math[t](v*Math.pow(10,p))/Math.pow(10,p)).toFixed(p);
          }
    });

console.log(
    Math.precision(3.1,3), // round 3 digits 
    Math.precision(0.12345,2,'ceil'), // ceil 2 digits
    Math.precision(1.1) // integer part
)

Answer

parseInt(number * 100) / 100; worked for me.

Answer

here is another solution to round only using floor, meaning, making sure calculated amount won't be bigger than the original amount (sometimes needed for transactions):

Math.floor(num* 100 )/100;
Answer

You can try this code:

    function FormatNumber(number, numberOfDigits = 2) {
        try {
            return new Intl.NumberFormat('en-US').format(parseFloat(number).toFixed(2));
        } catch (error) {
            return 0;
        }
    }

    var test1 = FormatNumber('1000000.4444');
    alert(test1); // 1,000,000.44

    var test2 = FormatNumber(100000000000.55555555, 4);
    alert(test2); // 100,000,000,000.56
Answer

This is how I solve my problem:

parseFloat(parseFloat(floatString).toFixed(2));
Answer

This answer will fail if value = 1.005.

As a better solution, the rounding problem can be avoided by using numbers represented in exponential notation:

Number(Math.round(1.005+'e2')+'e-2'); // 1.01

Cleaner code as suggested by @Kon, and the original author:

Number(Math.round(parseFloat(value + 'e' + decimalPlaces)) + 'e-' + decimalPlaces)

You may add toFixed() at the end to retain the decimal point e.g: 1.00 but note that it will return as string.

Number(Math.round(parseFloat(value + 'e' + decimalPlaces)) + 'e-' + decimalPlaces).toFixed(decimalPlaces)

Credit: Rounding Decimals in JavaScript

Answer
function currencyFormat (num) {
    return "$" + num.toFixed(2).replace(/(\d)(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))/g, "$1,")
}

console.info(currencyFormat(2665));   // $2,665.00
console.info(currencyFormat(102665)); // $102,665.00
Answer

function number_format(string,decimals=2,decimal=',',thousands='.',pre='R$ ',pos=' Reais'){
  var numbers = string.toString().match(/\d+/g).join([]);
  numbers = numbers.padStart(decimals+1, "0");
  var splitNumbers = numbers.split("").reverse();
  var mask = '';
  splitNumbers.forEach(function(d,i){
    if (i == decimals) { mask = decimal + mask; }
    if (i>(decimals+1) && ((i-2)%(decimals+1))==0) { mask = thousands + mask; }
    mask = d + mask;
  });
  return pre + mask + pos;
}
var element = document.getElementById("format");
var money= number_format("10987654321",2,',','.');
element.innerHTML = money;
#format{
display:inline-block;
padding:10px;
border:1px solid #ddd;
background:#f5f5f5;
}
<div id='format'>Test 123456789</div>

Answer

Just run into this one of longest thread, below is my solution:

parseFloat(Math.round((parseFloat(num * 100)).toFixed(2)) / 100 ).toFixed(2)

Let me know if anyone can poke a hole

Answer

var num1 = "0.1";
document.getElementById('num1').innerHTML = (Math.round(num1 * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);

var num2 = "1.341";
document.getElementById('num2').innerHTML = (Math.round(num2 * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);

var num3 = "1.345";
document.getElementById('num3').innerHTML = (Math.round(num3 * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);
span {
    border: 1px solid #000;
    margin: 5px;
    padding: 5px;
}
<span id="num1"></span>
<span id="num2"></span>
<span id="num3"></span>

Answer

Try below code:

function numberWithCommas(number) { 

   var newval = parseFloat(Math.round(number * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);

   return newval.toString().replace(/\B(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))/g, ",");
}
Answer
(num + "").replace(/^([0-9]*)(\.[0-9]{1,2})?.*$/,"$1$2")

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