jQuery .live() vs .on() method for adding a click event after loading dynamic html

I am using jQuery v.1.7.1 where the .live() method is apparently deprecated.

The problem I am having is that when dynamically loading html into an element using:

$('#parent').load("http://..."); 

If I try and add a click event afterwards it does not register the event using either of these methods:

$('#parent').click(function() ...); 

or

// according to documentation this should be used instead of .live()
$('#child').on('click', function() ...); 

What is the correct way to achieve this functionality? It only seems to work with .live() for me, but I shouldn't be using that method. Note that #child is a dynamically loaded element.

Thanks.

Answers:

Answer

If you want the click handler to work for an element that gets loaded dynamically, then you set the event handler on a parent object (that does not get loaded dynamically) and give it a selector that matches your dynamic object like this:

$('#parent').on("click", "#child", function() {});

The event handler will be attached to the #parent object and anytime a click event bubbles up to it that originated on #child, it will fire your click handler. This is called delegated event handling (the event handling is delegated to a parent object).

It's done this way because you can attach the event to the #parent object even when the #child object does not exist yet, but when it later exists and gets clicked on, the click event will bubble up to the #parent object, it will see that it originated on #child and there is an event handler for a click on #child and fire your event.

Answer

$(document).on('click', '.selector', function() { /* do stuff */ });

EDIT: I'm providing a bit more information on how this works, because... words. With this example, you are placing a listener on the entire document.

When you click on any element(s) matching .selector, the event bubbles up to the main document -- so long as there's no other listeners that call event.stopPropagation() method -- which would top the bubbling of an event to parent elements.

Instead of binding to a specific element or set of elements, you are listening for any events coming from elements that match the specified selector. This means you can create one listener, one time, that will automatically match currently existing elements as well as any dynamically added elements.

This is smart for a few reasons, including performance and memory utilization (in large scale applications)

EDIT:

Obviously, the closest parent element you can listen on is better, and you can use any element in place of document as long as the children you want to monitor events for are within that parent element... but that really does not have anything to do with the question.

Answer

The equivalent of .live() in 1.7 looks like this:

$(document).on('click', '#child', function() ...); 

Basically, watch the document for click events and filter them for #child.

Answer

I know it's a little late for an answer, but I've created a polyfill for the .live() method. I've tested it in jQuery 1.11, and it seems to work pretty well. I know that we're supposed to implement the .on() method wherever possible, but in big projects, where it's not possible to convert all .live() calls to the equivalent .on() calls for whatever reason, the following might work:

if(jQuery && !jQuery.fn.live) {
    jQuery.fn.live = function(evt, func) {
        $('body').on(evt, this.selector, func);
    }
}

Just include it after you load jQuery and before you call live().

Answer

.on() is for jQuery version 1.7 and above. If you have an older version, use this:

$("#SomeId").live("click",function(){
    //do stuff;
});
Answer

I used 'live' in my project but one of my friend suggested that i should use 'on' instead of live. And when i tried to use that i experienced a problem like you had.

On my pages i create buttons table rows and many dom stuff dynamically. but when i use on the magic disappeared.

The other solutions like use it like a child just calls your functions every time on every click. But i find a way to make it happen again and here is the solution.

Write your code as:

function caller(){
    $('.ObjectYouWntToCall').on("click", function() {...magic...});
}

Call caller(); after you create your object in the page like this.

$('<dom class="ObjectYouWntToCall">bla... bla...<dom>').appendTo("#whereeveryouwant");
caller();

By this way your function is called when it is supposed to not every click on the page.

Answer

Try this:

$('#parent').on('click', '#child', function() {
    // Code
});

From the $.on() documentation:

Event handlers are bound only to the currently selected elements; they must exist on the page at the time your code makes the call to .on().

Your #child element doesn't exist when you call $.on() on it, so the event isn't bound (unlike $.live()). #parent, however, does exist, so binding the event to that is fine.

The second argument in my code above acts as a 'filter' to only trigger if the event bubbled up to #parent from #child.

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