Format JavaScript date as yyyy-mm-dd

I have a date with the format Sun May 11,2014. How can I convert it to 2014-05-11 using JavaScript?

function taskDate(dateMilli) {
    var d = (new Date(dateMilli) + '').split(' ');
    d[2] = d[2] + ',';

    return [d[0], d[1], d[2], d[3]].join(' ');
}

var datemilli = Date.parse('Sun May 11,2014');
taskdate(datemilli);

The code above gives me the same date format, sun may 11,2014. How can I fix this?

Answers:

Answer

You can do:

function formatDate(date) {
    var d = new Date(date),
        month = '' + (d.getMonth() + 1),
        day = '' + d.getDate(),
        year = d.getFullYear();

    if (month.length < 2) 
        month = '0' + month;
    if (day.length < 2) 
        day = '0' + day;

    return [year, month, day].join('-');
}

Usage example:

alert(formatDate('Sun May 11,2014'));

Output:

2014-05-11

Demo on JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/abdulrauf6182012/2Frm3/

Answer

Just leverage the built-in toISOString method that brings your date to the ISO 8601 format:

yourDate.toISOString().split('T')[0]

Where yourDate is your date object.

Answer

I use this way to get the date in format yyyy-mm-dd :)

var todayDate = new Date().toISOString().slice(0,10);
Answer

The simplest way to convert your date to the yyyy-mm-dd format, is to do this:

var date = new Date("Sun May 11,2014");
var dateString = new Date(date.getTime() - (date.getTimezoneOffset() * 60000 ))
                    .toISOString()
                    .split("T")[0];

How it works:

  • new Date("Sun May 11,2014") converts the string "Sun May 11,2014" to a date object that represents the time Sun May 11 2014 00:00:00 in a timezone based on current locale (host system settings)
  • new Date(date.getTime() - (date.getTimezoneOffset() * 60000 )) converts your date to a date object that corresponds with the time Sun May 11 2014 00:00:00 in UTC (standard time) by subtracting the time zone offset
  • .toISOString() converts the date object to an ISO 8601 string 2014-05-11T00:00:00.000Z
  • .split("T") splits the string to array ["2014-05-11", "00:00:00.000Z"]
  • [0] takes the first element of that array

Demo

var date = new Date("Sun May 11,2014");
var dateString = new Date(date.getTime() - (date.getTimezoneOffset() * 60000 ))
                    .toISOString()
                    .split("T")[0];

console.log(dateString);

Answer
format = function date2str(x, y) {
    var z = {
        M: x.getMonth() + 1,
        d: x.getDate(),
        h: x.getHours(),
        m: x.getMinutes(),
        s: x.getSeconds()
    };
    y = y.replace(/(M+|d+|h+|m+|s+)/g, function(v) {
        return ((v.length > 1 ? "0" : "") + eval('z.' + v.slice(-1))).slice(-2)
    });

    return y.replace(/(y+)/g, function(v) {
        return x.getFullYear().toString().slice(-v.length)
    });
}

Result:

format(new Date('Sun May 11,2014'), 'yyyy-MM-dd')
"2014-05-11
Answer

A combination of some of the answers:

var d = new Date(date);
date = [
  d.getFullYear(),
  ('0' + (d.getMonth() + 1)).slice(-2),
  ('0' + d.getDate()).slice(-2)
].join('-');
Answer

If you don't have anything against using libraries, you could just use the Moments.js library like so:

var now = new Date();
var dateString = moment(now).format('YYYY-MM-DD');

var dateStringWithTime = moment(now).format('YYYY-MM-DD HH:mm:ss');
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/moment.js/2.18.1/moment.min.js"></script>

Answer

toISOString() assumes your date is local time and converts it to UTC. You will get an incorrect date string.

The following method should return what you need.

Date.prototype.yyyymmdd = function() {         

    var yyyy = this.getFullYear().toString();                                    
    var mm = (this.getMonth()+1).toString(); // getMonth() is zero-based         
    var dd  = this.getDate().toString();             

    return yyyy + '-' + (mm[1]?mm:"0"+mm[0]) + '-' + (dd[1]?dd:"0"+dd[0]);
};

Source: https://blog.justin.kelly.org.au/simple-javascript-function-to-format-the-date-as-yyyy-mm-dd/

Answer

Simply use this:

var date = new Date('1970-01-01'); // Or your date here
console.log((date.getMonth() + 1) + '/' + date.getDate() + '/' +  date.getFullYear());

Simple and sweet ;)

Answer

Retrieve year, month, and day, and then put them together. Straight, simple, and accurate.

function formatDate(date) {
    var year = date.getFullYear().toString();
    var month = (date.getMonth() + 101).toString().substring(1);
    var day = (date.getDate() + 100).toString().substring(1);
    return year + "-" + month + "-" + day;
}

//Usage example:
alert(formatDate(new Date()));

Answer

To consider the timezone also, this one-liner should be good without any library:

new Date().toLocaleString("en-IN", {timeZone: "Asia/Kolkata"}).split(',')[0]
Answer

You can try this: https://www.npmjs.com/package/timesolver

npm i timesolver

Use it in your code:

const timeSolver = require('timeSolver');
const date = new Date();
const dateString = timeSolver.getString(date, "YYYY-MM-DD");

You can get the date string by using this method:

getString
Answer

I suggest using something like formatDate-js instead of trying to replicate it every time. Just use a library that supports all the major strftime actions.

new Date().format("%Y-%m-%d")
Answer

None of these answers quite satisfied me. I wanted a cross-platform solution that gave me the day in the local timezone without using any external libraries.

This is what I came up with:

function localDay(time) {
  var minutesOffset = time.getTimezoneOffset()
  var millisecondsOffset = minutesOffset*60*1000
  var local = new Date(time - millisecondsOffset)
  return local.toISOString().substr(0, 10)
}

That should return the day of the date, in YYYY-MM-DD format, in the timezone the date references.

So for example, localDay(new Date("2017-08-24T03:29:22.099Z")) will return "2017-08-23" even though it's already the 24th at UTC.

You'll need to polyfill Date.prototype.toISOString for it to work in Internet Explorer 8, but it should be supported everywhere else.

Answer

You can use toLocaleDateString('fr-CA') on Date object

console.log(new Date('Sun May 11,2014').toLocaleDateString('fr-CA'));

Also I found out that those locales give right result from this locales list List of All Locales and Their Short Codes?

'en-CA'
'fr-CA'
'lt-LT'
'sv-FI'
'sv-SE'

var localesList = ["af-ZA",
  "am-ET",
  "ar-AE",
  "ar-BH",
  "ar-DZ",
  "ar-EG",
  "ar-IQ",
  "ar-JO",
  "ar-KW",
  "ar-LB",
  "ar-LY",
  "ar-MA",
  "arn-CL",
  "ar-OM",
  "ar-QA",
  "ar-SA",
  "ar-SY",
  "ar-TN",
  "ar-YE",
  "as-IN",
  "az-Cyrl-AZ",
  "az-Latn-AZ",
  "ba-RU",
  "be-BY",
  "bg-BG",
  "bn-BD",
  "bn-IN",
  "bo-CN",
  "br-FR",
  "bs-Cyrl-BA",
  "bs-Latn-BA",
  "ca-ES",
  "co-FR",
  "cs-CZ",
  "cy-GB",
  "da-DK",
  "de-AT",
  "de-CH",
  "de-DE",
  "de-LI",
  "de-LU",
  "dsb-DE",
  "dv-MV",
  "el-GR",
  "en-029",
  "en-AU",
  "en-BZ",
  "en-CA",
  "en-GB",
  "en-IE",
  "en-IN",
  "en-JM",
  "en-MY",
  "en-NZ",
  "en-PH",
  "en-SG",
  "en-TT",
  "en-US",
  "en-ZA",
  "en-ZW",
  "es-AR",
  "es-BO",
  "es-CL",
  "es-CO",
  "es-CR",
  "es-DO",
  "es-EC",
  "es-ES",
  "es-GT",
  "es-HN",
  "es-MX",
  "es-NI",
  "es-PA",
  "es-PE",
  "es-PR",
  "es-PY",
  "es-SV",
  "es-US",
  "es-UY",
  "es-VE",
  "et-EE",
  "eu-ES",
  "fa-IR",
  "fi-FI",
  "fil-PH",
  "fo-FO",
  "fr-BE",
  "fr-CA",
  "fr-CH",
  "fr-FR",
  "fr-LU",
  "fr-MC",
  "fy-NL",
  "ga-IE",
  "gd-GB",
  "gl-ES",
  "gsw-FR",
  "gu-IN",
  "ha-Latn-NG",
  "he-IL",
  "hi-IN",
  "hr-BA",
  "hr-HR",
  "hsb-DE",
  "hu-HU",
  "hy-AM",
  "id-ID",
  "ig-NG",
  "ii-CN",
  "is-IS",
  "it-CH",
  "it-IT",
  "iu-Cans-CA",
  "iu-Latn-CA",
  "ja-JP",
  "ka-GE",
  "kk-KZ",
  "kl-GL",
  "km-KH",
  "kn-IN",
  "kok-IN",
  "ko-KR",
  "ky-KG",
  "lb-LU",
  "lo-LA",
  "lt-LT",
  "lv-LV",
  "mi-NZ",
  "mk-MK",
  "ml-IN",
  "mn-MN",
  "mn-Mong-CN",
  "moh-CA",
  "mr-IN",
  "ms-BN",
  "ms-MY",
  "mt-MT",
  "nb-NO",
  "ne-NP",
  "nl-BE",
  "nl-NL",
  "nn-NO",
  "nso-ZA",
  "oc-FR",
  "or-IN",
  "pa-IN",
  "pl-PL",
  "prs-AF",
  "ps-AF",
  "pt-BR",
  "pt-PT",
  "qut-GT",
  "quz-BO",
  "quz-EC",
  "quz-PE",
  "rm-CH",
  "ro-RO",
  "ru-RU",
  "rw-RW",
  "sah-RU",
  "sa-IN",
  "se-FI",
  "se-NO",
  "se-SE",
  "si-LK",
  "sk-SK",
  "sl-SI",
  "sma-NO",
  "sma-SE",
  "smj-NO",
  "smj-SE",
  "smn-FI",
  "sms-FI",
  "sq-AL",
  "sr-Cyrl-BA",
  "sr-Cyrl-CS",
  "sr-Cyrl-ME",
  "sr-Cyrl-RS",
  "sr-Latn-BA",
  "sr-Latn-CS",
  "sr-Latn-ME",
  "sr-Latn-RS",
  "sv-FI",
  "sv-SE",
  "sw-KE",
  "syr-SY",
  "ta-IN",
  "te-IN",
  "tg-Cyrl-TJ",
  "th-TH",
  "tk-TM",
  "tn-ZA",
  "tr-TR",
  "tt-RU",
  "tzm-Latn-DZ",
  "ug-CN",
  "uk-UA",
  "ur-PK",
  "uz-Cyrl-UZ",
  "uz-Latn-UZ",
  "vi-VN",
  "wo-SN",
  "xh-ZA",
  "yo-NG",
  "zh-CN",
  "zh-HK",
  "zh-MO",
  "zh-SG",
  "zh-TW",
  "zu-ZA"
];

localesList.forEach(lcl => {
  if ("2014-05-11" === new Date('Sun May 11,2014').toLocaleDateString(lcl)) {
    console.log(lcl, new Date('Sun May 11,2014').toLocaleDateString(lcl));
  }
});

Answer

Here is one way to do it:

var date = Date.parse('Sun May 11,2014');

function format(date) {
  date = new Date(date);

  var day = ('0' + date.getDate()).slice(-2);
  var month = ('0' + (date.getMonth() + 1)).slice(-2);
  var year = date.getFullYear();

  return year + '-' + month + '-' + day;
}

console.log(format(date));
Answer

Date.js is great for this.

require("datejs")
(new Date()).toString("yyyy-MM-dd")
Answer

function myYmd(D){
    var pad = function(num) {
        var s = '0' + num;
        return s.substr(s.length - 2);
    }
    var Result = D.getFullYear() + '-' + pad((D.getMonth() + 1)) + '-' + pad(D.getDate());
    return Result;
}

var datemilli = new Date('Sun May 11,2014');
document.write(myYmd(datemilli));

Answer

var d = new Date("Sun May 1,2014");

var year  = d.getFullYear();
var month = d.getMonth() + 1;
var day   = d.getDate(); 

month = checkZero(month);             
day   = checkZero(day);

var date = "";

date += year;
date += "-";
date += month;
date += "-";
date += day;

document.querySelector("#display").innerHTML = date;
    
function checkZero(i) 
{
    if (i < 10) 
    {
        i = "0" + i
    };  // add zero in front of numbers < 10

    return i;
}
<div id="display"></div>

Answer
new Date(new Date(YOUR_DATE.toISOString()).getTime() - 
                 (YOUR_DATE.getTimezoneOffset() * 60 * 1000)).toISOString().substr(0, 10)
Answer

A few of the previous answer were OK, but they weren't very flexible. I wanted something that could really handle more edge cases, so I took @orangleliu 's answer and expanded on it. https://jsfiddle.net/8904cmLd/1/

function DateToString(inDate, formatString) {
    // Written by m1m1k 2018-04-05

    // Validate that we're working with a date
    if(!isValidDate(inDate))
    {
        inDate = new Date(inDate);
    }

    // See the jsFiddle for extra code to be able to use DateToString('Sun May 11,2014', 'USA');
    //formatString = CountryCodeToDateFormat(formatString);

    var dateObject = {
        M: inDate.getMonth() + 1,
        d: inDate.getDate(),
        D: inDate.getDate(),
        h: inDate.getHours(),
        m: inDate.getMinutes(),
        s: inDate.getSeconds(),
        y: inDate.getFullYear(),
        Y: inDate.getFullYear()
    };

    // Build Regex Dynamically based on the list above.
    // It should end up with something like this: "/([Yy]+|M+|[Dd]+|h+|m+|s+)/g"
    var dateMatchRegex = joinObj(dateObject, "+|") + "+";
    var regEx = new RegExp(dateMatchRegex,"g");
    formatString = formatString.replace(regEx, function(formatToken) {
        var datePartValue = dateObject[formatToken.slice(-1)];
        var tokenLength = formatToken.length;

        // A conflict exists between specifying 'd' for no zero pad -> expand
        // to '10' and specifying yy for just two year digits '01' instead
        // of '2001'.  One expands, the other contracts.
        //
        // So Constrict Years but Expand All Else
        if (formatToken.indexOf('y') < 0 && formatToken.indexOf('Y') < 0)
        {
            // Expand single digit format token 'd' to
            // multi digit value '10' when needed
            var tokenLength = Math.max(formatToken.length, datePartValue.toString().length);
        }
        var zeroPad = (datePartValue.toString().length < formatToken.length ? "0".repeat(tokenLength) : "");
        return (zeroPad + datePartValue).slice(-tokenLength);
    });

    return formatString;
}

Example usage:

DateToString('Sun May 11,2014', 'MM/DD/yy');
DateToString('Sun May 11,2014', 'yyyy.MM.dd');
DateToString(new Date('Sun Dec 11,2014'),'yy-M-d');
Answer

This worked for me to get the current date in the desired format (YYYYMMDD HH:MM:SS):

var d = new Date();

var date1 = d.getFullYear() + '' +
            ((d.getMonth()+1) < 10 ? "0" + (d.getMonth() + 1) : (d.getMonth() + 1)) +
            '' +
            (d.getDate() < 10 ? "0" + d.getDate() : d.getDate());

var time1 = (d.getHours() < 10 ? "0" + d.getHours() : d.getHours()) +
            ':' +
            (d.getMinutes() < 10 ? "0" + d.getMinutes() : d.getMinutes()) +
            ':' +
            (d.getSeconds() < 10 ? "0" + d.getSeconds() : d.getSeconds());

print(date1+' '+time1);
Answer

No library is needed

Just pure JavaScript.

The example below gets the last two months from today:

var d = new Date()
d.setMonth(d.getMonth() - 2);
var dateString = new Date(d);
console.log('Before Format', dateString, 'After format', dateString.toISOString().slice(0,10))

Answer

PHP compatible date format

Here is a small function which can take the same parameters as the PHP function date() and return a date/time string in JavaScript.

Note that not all date() format options from PHP are supported. You can extend the parts object to create the missing format-token

/**
 * Date formatter with PHP "date()"-compatible format syntax.
 */
const formatDate = (format, date) => {
  if (!format) { format = 'Y-m-d' }
  if (!date) { date = new Date() }

  const parts = {
    Y: date.getFullYear().toString(),
    y: ('00' + (date.getYear() - 100)).toString().slice(-2),
    m: ('0' + (date.getMonth() + 1)).toString().slice(-2),
    n: (date.getMonth() + 1).toString(),
    d: ('0' + date.getDate()).toString().slice(-2),
    j: date.getDate().toString(),
    H: ('0' + date.getHours()).toString().slice(-2),
    G: date.getHours().toString(),
    i: ('0' + date.getMinutes()).toString().slice(-2),
    s: ('0' + date.getSeconds()).toString().slice(-2)
  }

  const modifiers = Object.keys(parts).join('')
  const reDate = new RegExp('(?<!\\\\)[' + modifiers + ']', 'g')
  const reEscape = new RegExp('\\\\([' + modifiers + '])', 'g')

  return format
    .replace(reDate, $0 => parts[$0])
    .replace(reEscape, ($0, $1) => $1)
}

// ----- EXAMPLES -----
console.log( formatDate() ); // "2019-05-21"
console.log( formatDate('H:i:s') ); // "16:21:32"
console.log( formatDate('Y-m-d, o\\n H:i:s') ); // "2019-05-21, on 16:21:32"
console.log( formatDate('Y-m-d', new Date(2000000000000)) ); // "2033-05-18"

Gist

Here is a gist with an updated version of the formatDate() function and additional examples: https://gist.github.com/stracker-phil/c7b68ea0b1d5bbb97af0a6a3dc66e0d9

Answer

Yet another combination of the answers. Nicely readable, but a little lengthy.

function getCurrentDayTimestamp() {
  const d = new Date();

  return new Date(
    Date.UTC(
      d.getFullYear(),
      d.getMonth(),
      d.getDate(),
      d.getHours(),
      d.getMinutes(),
      d.getSeconds()
    )
  // `toIsoString` returns something like "2017-08-22T08:32:32.847Z"
  // and we want the first part ("2017-08-22")
  ).toISOString().slice(0, 10);
}
Answer

If the date needs to be the same across all time zones, for example represents some value from the database, then be sure to use UTC versions of the day, month, fullyear functions on the JavaScript date object as this will display in UTC time and avoid off-by-one errors in certain time zones.

Even better, use the Moment.js date library for this sort of formatting.

Answer

I modified Samit Satpute's response as follows:

var newstartDate = new Date();
// newstartDate.setDate(newstartDate.getDate() - 1);
var startDate = newstartDate.toISOString().replace(/[-T:\.Z]/g, ""); //.slice(0, 10); // To get the Yesterday's Date in YYYY MM DD Format
console.log(startDate);

Answer

Format and finding maximum and minimum date from hashmap data:

var obj = {"a":'2001-15-01', "b": '2001-12-02' , "c": '2001-1-03'};

function findMaxMinDate(obj){
  let formatEncode = (id)=> { let s = id.split('-'); return `${s[0]+'-'+s[2]+'-'+s[1]}`}
  let formatDecode = (id)=> { let s = id.split('/'); return `${s[2]+'-'+s[0]+'-'+s[1]}`}
  let arr = Object.keys( obj ).map(( key )=> { return new Date(formatEncode(obj[key])); });
  let min = new Date(Math.min.apply(null, arr)).toLocaleDateString();
  let max = new Date(Math.max.apply(null, arr)).toLocaleDateString();
  return {maxd: `${formatDecode(max)}`, mind:`${formatDecode(min)}`}
}

console.log(findMaxMinDate(obj));

Answer

Reformatting a date string is fairly straightforward, e.g.

var s = 'Sun May 11,2014';

function reformatDate(s) {
  function z(n){return ('0' + n).slice(-2)}
  var months = [,'jan','feb','mar','apr','may','jun',
                 'jul','aug','sep','oct','nov','dec'];
  var b = s.split(/\W+/);
  return b[3] + '-' +
    z(months.indexOf(b[1].substr(0,3).toLowerCase())) + '-' +
    z(b[2]);
}

console.log(reformatDate(s));

Answer

This code change the order of DD MM YYYY

function convertDate(format, date) {
    let formatArray = format.split('/');
    if (formatArray.length != 3) {
        console.error('Use a valid Date format');
        return;
    }
    function getType(type) { return type == 'DD' ? d.getDate() : type == 'MM' ? d.getMonth() + 1 : type == 'YYYY' && d.getFullYear(); }
    function pad(s) { return (s < 10) ? '0' + s : s; }
    var d = new Date(date);
    return [pad(getType(formatArray[0])), pad(getType(formatArray[1])), getType(formatArray[2])].join('/');
}
Answer
new Date().toLocaleDateString('pt-br').split( '/' ).reverse( ).join( '-' );

or

new Date().toISOString().split('T')[0]
new Date('23/03/2020'.split('/').reverse().join('-')).toISOString()
new Date('23/03/2020'.split('/').reverse().join('-')).toISOString().split('T')[0]

Try this!

Answer

When ES2018 rolls around (works in chrome) you can simply regex it

(new Date())
    .toISOString()
    .replace(
        /^(?<year>\d+)-(?<month>\d+)-(?<day>\d+)T.*$/,
        '$<year>-$<month>-$<day>'
    )

2020-07-14

Or if you'd like something pretty versatile with no libraries whatsoever

(new Date())
    .toISOString()
    .match(
        /^(?<yyyy>\d\d(?<yy>\d\d))-(?<mm>0?(?<m>\d+))-(?<dd>0?(?<d>\d+))T(?<HH>0?(?<H>\d+)):(?<MM>0?(?<M>\d+)):(?<SSS>(?<SS>0?(?<S>\d+))\.\d+)(?<timezone>[A-Z][\dA-Z.-:]*)$/
    )
    .groups

Which results in extracting the following

{
    H: "8"
    HH: "08"
    M: "45"
    MM: "45"
    S: "42"
    SS: "42"
    SSS: "42.855"
    d: "14"
    dd: "14"
    m: "7"
    mm: "07"
    timezone: "Z"
    yy: "20"
    yyyy: "2020"
}

Which you can use like so with replace(..., '$<d>/$<m>/\'$<yy> @ $<H>:$<MM>') as at the top instead of .match(...).groups to get

14/7/'20 @ 8:45
Answer

If you use momentjs, now they include a constant for that format YYYY-MM-DD:

date.format(moment.HTML5_FMT.DATE)
Answer

Shortest

.toJSON().slice(0,10);

var d = new Date('Sun May 11,2014' +' UTC');   // Parse as UTC
let str = d.toJSON().slice(0,10);              // Show as UTC

console.log(str);

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