How to pass arguments to addEventListener listener function?

The situation is somewhat like-

var someVar = some_other_function();
someObj.addEventListener("click", function(){
    some_function(someVar);
}, false);

The problem is that the value of someVar is not visible inside the listener function of the addEventListener, where it is probably being treated as a new variable.

Answers:

Answer

There is absolutely nothing wrong with the code you've written. Both some_function and someVar should be accessible, in case they were available in the context where anonymous

function() { some_function(someVar); } 

was created.

Check if the alert gives you the value you've been looking for, be sure it will be accessible in the scope of anonymous function (unless you have more code that operates on the same someVar variable next to the call to addEventListener)

var someVar; 
someVar = some_other_function();
alert(someVar);
someObj.addEventListener("click", function(){
    some_function(someVar);
}, false);
Answer

Why not just get the arguments from the target attribute of the event?

Example:

const someInput = document.querySelector('button');
someInput.addEventListener('click', myFunc, false);
someInput.myParam = 'This is my parameter';
function myFunc(evt)
{
  window.alert(evt.currentTarget.myParam);
}
<button class="input">Show parameter</button>

JavaScript is a prototype-oriented language, remember!

Answer

This question is old but I thought I'd offer an alternative using ES5's .bind() - for posterity. :)

function some_func(otherFunc, ev) {
    // magic happens
}
someObj.addEventListener("click", some_func.bind(null, some_other_func), false);

Just be aware that you need to set up your listener function with the first param as the argument you're passing into bind (your other function) and the second param is now the event (instead of the first, as it would have been).

Answer

You can just bind all necessary arguments with 'bind':

root.addEventListener('click', myPrettyHandler.bind(null, event, arg1, ... ));

In this way you'll always get the event, arg1, and other stuff passed to myPrettyHandler.

http://passy.svbtle.com/partial-application-in-javascript-using-bind

Answer

Quite and old question but I had the same issue today. Cleanest solution I found is to use the concept of currying.

The code for that:

someObj.addEventListener('click', some_function(someVar));

var some_function = function(someVar) {
    return function curried_func(e) {
        // do something here
    }
}

By naming the curried function it allows you to call Object.removeEventListener to unregister the eventListener at a later execution time.

Answer

You can add and remove eventlisteners with arguments by declaring a function as a variable.

myaudio.addEventListener('ended',funcName=function(){newSrc(myaudio)},false);

newSrc is the method with myaudio as parameter funcName is the function name variable

You can remove the listener with myaudio.removeEventListener('ended',func,false);

Answer

You could pass somevar by value(not by reference) via a javascript feature known as closure:

var someVar='origin';
func = function(v){
    console.log(v);
}
document.addEventListener('click',function(someVar){
   return function(){func(someVar)}
}(someVar));
someVar='changed'

Or you could write a common wrap function such as wrapEventCallback:

function wrapEventCallback(callback){
    var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);
    return function(e){
        callback.apply(this, args)
    }
}
var someVar='origin';
func = function(v){
    console.log(v);
}
document.addEventListener('click',wrapEventCallback(func,someVar))
someVar='changed'

Here wrapEventCallback(func,var1,var2) is like:

func.bind(null, var1,var2)
Answer

someVar value should be accessible only in some_function() context, not from listener's. If you like to have it within listener, you must do something like:

someObj.addEventListener("click",
                         function(){
                             var newVar = someVar;
                             some_function(someVar);
                         },
                         false);

and use newVar instead.

The other way is to return someVar value from some_function() for using it further in listener (as a new local var):

var someVar = some_function(someVar);
Answer

Here's yet another way (This one works inside for loops):

var someVar = some_other_function();
someObj.addEventListener("click", 

function(theVar){
    return function(){some_function(theVar)};
}(someVar),

false);
Answer

Function.prototype.bind() is the way to bind a target function to a particular scope and optionally define the this object within the target function.

someObj.addEventListener("click", some_function.bind(this), false);

Or to capture some of the lexical scope, for example in a loop:

someObj.addEventListener("click", some_function.bind(this, arg1, arg2), false);

Finally, if the this parameter is not needed within the target function:

someObj.addEventListener("click", some_function.bind(null, arg1, arg2), false);
Answer

Use

   el.addEventListener('click',
    function(){
        // this will give you the id value 
        alert(this.id);    
    },
false);

And if you want to pass any custom value into this anonymous function then the easiest way to do it is

 // this will dynamically create property a property
 // you can create anything like el.<your  variable>
 el.myvalue = "hello world";
 el.addEventListener('click',
    function(){
        //this will show you the myvalue 
        alert(el.myvalue);
        // this will give you the id value 
        alert(this.id);    
    },
false);

Works perfectly in my project. Hope this will help

Answer
    $form.addEventListener('submit', save.bind(null, data, keyword, $name.value, myStemComment));
    function save(data, keyword, name, comment, event) {

This is how I got event passed properly.

Answer

Sending arguments to an eventListener's callback function requires creating an isolated function and passing arguments to that isolated function.

Here's a nice little helper function you can use. Based on "hello world's" example above.)

One thing that is also needed is to maintain a reference to the function so we can remove the listener cleanly.

// Lambda closure chaos.
//
// Send an anonymous function to the listener, but execute it immediately.
// This will cause the arguments are captured, which is useful when running 
// within loops.
//
// The anonymous function returns a closure, that will be executed when 
// the event triggers. And since the arguments were captured, any vars 
// that were sent in will be unique to the function.

function addListenerWithArgs(elem, evt, func, vars){
    var f = function(ff, vv){
            return (function (){
                ff(vv);
            });
    }(func, vars);

    elem.addEventListener(evt, f);

    return f;
}

// Usage:

function doSomething(withThis){
    console.log("withThis", withThis);
}

// Capture the function so we can remove it later.
var storeFunc = addListenerWithArgs(someElem, "click", doSomething, "foo");

// To remove the listener, use the normal routine:
someElem.removeEventListener("click", storeFunc);
Answer

One way is doing this with an outer function:

elem.addEventListener('click', (function(numCopy) {
  return function() {
    alert(numCopy)
  };
})(num));

This method of wrapping an anonymous function in parentheses and calling it right away is called an IIFE (Immediately-Invoked Function Expression)

You can check an example with two parameters in http://codepen.io/froucher/pen/BoWwgz.

catimg.addEventListener('click', (function(c, i){
  return function() {
    c.meows++;
    i.textContent = c.name + '\'s meows are: ' + c.meows;
  }
})(cat, catmeows));
Answer

If I'm not mistaken using calling the function with bind actually creates a new function that is returned by the bind method. This will cause you problems later or if you would like to remove the event listener, as it's basically like an anonymous function:

// Possible:
function myCallback() { /* code here */ }
someObject.addEventListener('event', myCallback);
someObject.removeEventListener('event', myCallback);

// Not Possible:
function myCallback() { /* code here */ }
someObject.addEventListener('event', function() { myCallback });
someObject.removeEventListener('event', /* can't remove anonymous function */);

So take that in mind.

If you are using ES6 you could do the same as suggested but a bit cleaner:

someObject.addEventListener('event', () => myCallback(params));
Answer

nice one line alternative

element.addEventListener('dragstart',(evt) => onDragStart(param1, param2, param3, evt));
function onDragStart(param1, param2, param3, evt) {

 //some action...

}
Answer

Also try these (IE8 + Chrome. I dont know for FF):

function addEvent(obj, type, fn) {
    eval('obj.on'+type+'=fn');
}

function removeEvent(obj, type) {
    eval('obj.on'+type+'=null');
}

// Use :

function someFunction (someArg) {alert(someArg);}

var object=document.getElementById('somObject_id') ;
var someArg="Hi there !";
var func=function(){someFunction (someArg)};

// mouseover is inactive
addEvent (object, 'mouseover', func);
// mouseover is now active
addEvent (object, 'mouseover');
// mouseover is inactive

Hope there is no typos :-)

Answer

I was stuck in this as I was using it in a loop for finding elements and adding listner to it. If you're using it in a loop, then this will work perfectly

for (var i = 0; i < states_array.length; i++) {
     var link = document.getElementById('apply_'+states_array[i].state_id);
     link.my_id = i;
     link.addEventListener('click', function(e) {   
        alert(e.target.my_id);        
        some_function(states_array[e.target.my_id].css_url);
     });
}
Answer
    var EV = {
        ev: '',
        fn: '',
        elem: '',
        add: function () {
            this.elem.addEventListener(this.ev, this.fn, false);
        }
    };

    function cons() {
        console.log('some what');
    }

    EV.ev = 'click';
    EV.fn = cons;
    EV.elem = document.getElementById('body');
    EV.add();

//If you want to add one more listener for load event then simply add this two lines of code:

    EV.ev = 'load';
    EV.add();
Answer

The following approach worked well for me. Modified from here.

function callback(theVar) {
  return function() {
    theVar();
  }
}

function some_other_function() {
  document.body.innerHTML += "made it.";
}

var someVar = some_other_function;
document.getElementById('button').addEventListener('click', callback(someVar));
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <body>
    <button type="button" id="button">Click Me!</button>
  </body>
</html>

Answer

In 2019, lots of api changes, the best answer no longer works, without fix bug.

share some working code.

Inspired by all above answer.

 button_element = document.getElementById('your-button')

 button_element.setAttribute('your-parameter-name',your-parameter-value);

 button_element.addEventListener('click', your_function);


 function your_function(event)
   {
      //when click print the parameter value 
      console.log(event.currentTarget.attributes.your-parameter-name.value;)
   }
Answer

The following answer is correct but the below code is not working in IE8 if suppose you compressed the js file using yuicompressor. (In fact,still most of the US peoples using IE8)

var someVar; 
someVar = some_other_function();
alert(someVar);
someObj.addEventListener("click",
                         function(){
                          some_function(someVar);
                         },
                         false);

So, we can fix the above issue as follows and it works fine in all browsers

var someVar, eventListnerFunc;
someVar = some_other_function();
eventListnerFunc = some_function(someVar);
someObj.addEventListener("click", eventListnerFunc, false);

Hope, it would be useful for some one who is compressing the js file in production environment.

Good Luck!!

Answer

There is a special variable inside all functions: arguments. You can pass your parameters as anonymous parameters and access them (by order) through the arguments variable.

Example:

var someVar = some_other_function();
someObj.addEventListener("click", function(someVar){
    some_function(arguments[0]);
}, false);
Answer

The following code worked fine for me (firefox):

for (var i=0; i<3; i++) {
   element = new ...   // create your element
   element.counter = i;
   element.addEventListener('click', function(e){
        console.log(this.counter);
        ...            // another code with this element
   }, false);
}

Output:

0
1
2
Answer

You need:

newElem.addEventListener('click', {
    handleEvent: function (event) {
        clickImg(parameter);
    }
});
Answer

Probably not optimal, but simple enough for those not super js savvy. Put the function that calls addEventListener into its own function. That way any function values passed into it maintain their own scope and you can iterate over that function as much as you want.

Example I worked out with file reading as I needed to capture and render a preview of the image and filename. It took me awhile to avoid asynchronous issues when utilizing a multiple file upload type. I would accidentally see the same 'name' on all renders despite uploading different files.

Originally, all the readFile() function was within the readFiles() function. This caused asynchronous scoping issues.

    function readFiles(input) {
      if (input.files) {
        for(i=0;i<input.files.length;i++) {

          var filename = input.files[i].name;

          if ( /\.(jpe?g|jpg|png|gif|svg|bmp)$/i.test(filename) ) {
            readFile(input.files[i],filename);
          }
       }
      }
    } //end readFiles



    function readFile(file,filename) {
            var reader = new FileReader();

            reader.addEventListener("load", function() { alert(filename);}, false);

            reader.readAsDataURL(file);

    } //end readFile
Answer

just would like to add. if anyone is adding a function which updates checkboxes to an event listener, you would have to use event.target instead of this to update the checkboxes.

Answer

Other alternative, perhaps not as elegant as the use of bind, but it is valid for events in a loop

for (var key in catalog){
    document.getElementById(key).my_id = key
    document.getElementById(key).addEventListener('click', function(e) {
        editorContent.loadCatalogEntry(e.srcElement.my_id)
    }, false);
}

It has been tested for google chrome extensions and maybe e.srcElement must be replaced by e.source in other browsers

I found this solution using the comment posted by Imatoria but I cannot mark it as useful because I do not have enough reputation :D

Answer

This solution may good for looking

var some_other_function = someVar => function() {
}

someObj.addEventListener('click', some_other_function(someVar));

or bind valiables will be also good

Answer

I have very simplistic approach. This may work for others as it helped me. It is... When you are having multiple elements/variables assigned a same function and you want to pass the reference, the simplest solution is...

function Name()
{

this.methodName = "Value"

}

That's it. It worked for me. So simple.

Answer

Since your event listener is 'click', you can:

someObj.setAttribute("onclick", "function(parameter)");

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